PURCHASE FULL WORK -3500

ASSESSMENT OF IMPLEMENTATION OF GENERIC NURSING CURRICULUM IN SELECTED NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES

NURSING SCIENCE PROJECT TOPICS AND MATERIALS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title Page … … … … … … … … i
Approval Page … … … … … … … … ii
Certification … … … … … … … … iii
Dedication … … … … … … … … iv
Acknowledgement … … … … … … … … v
Table of Contents … … … … … … … … vi
List of Tables … … … … … … … … ix
List of Figures … … … … … … … … xi
Abstract … … … … … … … … xii
CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
Background of the Study … … … … … … … … 1
Statement of the Problem … … … … … … … … 4
The Purpose of the Study … … … … … … … … 5
The Objectives of the Study … … … … … … … … 5
Research Questions … … … … … … … … 6
The Significance of the Study … … … … … … … 6
Scope of Study … … … … … … … 7
Operational Definition of Terms … … … … … … … 7
CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW
Brief History and Trends of Nursing Education … … … … … 9
Factors Affecting Nursing Education … … … … … 12
The Concept of Curriculum and Curriculum Implementation … … … 15
Factors Affecting Implementation of Curriculum … … … … … 17
Classroom Management in Curriculum Implementation … … … … 17
Educators in Curriculum Implementation … … … … … … 18
Classroom Environment in Curriculum Implementation … … … … 20
Students in Curriculum Implementation … … … … … … 21
Resource Materials in Curriculum Implementation … … … … … 21
Resource Centre in Curriculum Implementation … … … … … 24
Theoretical Framework … … … … … … … … 26
Cognitive Theory … … … … … … … … 28
Empirical Review of Related Literature … … … … … … 34
Curriculum for Generic Nursing Education in Nigeria … … … … 35
Curriculum Objectives of Generic Nursing Education … … … … 36
Summary of Reviewed Literature … … … … … … … 38
CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research Design … … … … … … … … 39
Are of Study … … … … … … … … 39
Population of the Study … … … … … … … … 40
Sample … … … … … … … … 40
Sampling Procedure … … … … … … … … 41
Instrument for Data Collection … … … … … … … 42
Validity of Instrument … … … … … … … … 42
Reliability of Instrument … … … … … … … … 43
Ethical Consideration … … … … … … … … 43
Procedure for Data Collection … … … … … … … … 44
Method of Data Analysis … … … … … … … … 45

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS
Demographics of Respondents … … … … … … … … 46
Summary of Findings … … … … … … … … 80
CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION OF MAJOR FINDINGS
Discussion … … … … … … … … 86
Limitation of Study … … … … … … … … 92
Suggestion for Further Studies … … … … … … … … 92
Recommendations … … … … … … … … 92
Summary … … … … … … … … 93
Conclusion … … … … … … … … 94
BIBLIOGRAPHY
APPENDICES

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Figures and symbols used extensively in he research report … 46
Table 2 Percentage returns of questionnaire/interview questions administered to
research subjects (educators, students and Heads of Department HODs) 46

Table 3: Students Demographic Characteristics … … … … 47
Table 4: Educators Demographics … … … … … … 48
Table 5: Response scores for educators question 12- what type of manpower
problems do you have? … … … … … … 50
Table 6: Response scores for Educators question 19 – what is the teacher – student
ratio in a teaching class? … … … … … … 51
Table 7: Response scores for educators question 14 – what are the problems of material resources … … … … … … 52
Table 8: Response scores for educators question 16 – what are the problems of physical facilities/infrastructure? … … … … … 53
Table 9: Response scores for educators question 21 – what are the problems of practical Demonstration? … … … … … 55
Table 10: Response scores for educators question 22 – what is demonstrator –
Student ratio? … … … … … … … 57
Table 11: Response scores for educators question 24 – what are the problems for
clinical posting and training? … … … … … 58
Table 12: Response scores for educators question 18 – what are the problems of
classroom teaching? … … … … … … 60
Table 13: Response scores for educators question 14 – what are the problems in
students examination … … … … … … 61
Table 14: Response scores for educators question 28 – what are administration
difficulties faced by educators? … … … … … 62
Table 15: Students’ response to manpower Problems … … … 63
Table 16: Students’ response to problems of material resources … … 65
Table 17: Responses of students to physical facilities/infrastructure problem … 66
Table 18: Practical demonstration problems identified by students … … … 68
Table 19: Clinical posting and training problems identified by students … 70
Table 20: Responses of students to classroom learning problems … … 72
Table 21: Problems of private study identified by Students … … … 74 Table 22: Problems students face in course examination … … … 75
Table 23: Responses from Heads of Department … … … … 76

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Student Perception Motivation Model … … … … 32
Figure 2: Conceptual Model … … … … … … … 33

ABSTRACT
This study focused on assessment of implementation of generic nursing curriculum in selected Nigerian universities. It particularly focused on identifying the difficulties associated with implementation of the generic nursing curriculum by nurse educators and students and exploring the opinions of Heads of Department on the implementation of the generic nursing curriculum.
Purposive sampling was used to select the universities. Stratified sampling was used to select proportionate size of students from 300, 400, and 500 levels. Simple random sampling was used to select the students. All the available nurse educators were used for the study. The data for this study was collected using two sets of structured questionnaire, one for nurse educators and the other for students, and in depth interview for the heads of the department, developed and validated by the researcher. The questionnaires were administered on the spot in the class setting to both lecturers and students as well as individually to lecturers in their offices. The interview questions were mailed to the heads of department with areas of emphasis highlighted to serve as guide and prevent wandering away from the research topic. The responses to the questionnaires were presented as frequencies and their percentages on tables, while the responses from the interview questions were categorised, coded and presented on tables. The data from the quantitative and qualitative study were triangulated to bring out the facts. The result of the findings showed that there is acute shortage of academic staff in the implementation of the generic nursing curriculum in all the universities used for the study. The major manpower/personnel problems identified are inadequate number of lecturers (100%) and (80.9%) for nurse educators and students respectively, inadequate number of clinical instructors in the clinical areas and inadequate number of practical demonstrators in the school. The findings also showed that there are difficulties with material resources in the implementation of the generic nursing curriculum. The major difficulties are inadequate number of computers, inadequate classrooms (92.9%) and (94.8%) for nurse educators and students, and inadequate equipment in nursing/midwifery laboratory. Nurse educators encounter difficulties with teaching in the implementation of the generic nursing curriculum. Major problems identified are too many courses in the curriculum, inadequate number of teaching aids, and excessive work load (91.7%) each. Students encounter difficulties with learning in the implementation of the generic nursing curriculum. Major problems identified are lecture overload (80.5%), and lack of audio-visuals. Major difficulties in clinical posting are insufficient clinical experience (75.6%), lack of cooperation from nurses working in the clinical area (71.4%), absence of clinical instructors/preceptors, and difficulty in transportation of students to the clinical areas (74.2%). The major administrative problems encountered in the implementation of generic nursing curriculum are inadequate funding (100%), inadequate staff training and development (81.8%) and inadequate incentive for staff (72.7%). Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended among others that departments of nursing should endeavour to ensure that the necessary manpower and personnel are in place for the effective and successful implementation of the curriculum. Material resources should be made available and the university authority should ensure that teachers and students alike have easy access to these materials; emphasis should be laid on ensuring that the library is properly equipped, provision of ICT materials which include computers and audio-visual learning aids, as well as provision of equipment in the nursing laboratory, midwifery laboratory, and the provision of instructional materials in the resource centre of the institution. Lecture time should be properly planned.

CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION

Background to the Study
Education is absolutely essential in the development of any country. It is an indispensable factor in the modern search for the solution of man’s problems. Curriculum is the crux of the whole educational process. Without curriculum no educational endeavour can be conceived (Neeraja, 2007). Curriculum according to Neeraja (2007) is a systematic and planned series of intended learning conceived to be imparted through selected, planned, organised and sequential learning experiences for a defined group of learners to attain the stated aims of a particular educational programme. It is a blue print or plan of the school that includes the experiences for the learners to encounter.
According to Offorma (1994), teachers set up learning opportunities aimed at enabling learners acquire the desired knowledge, skills, and values specified in the curriculum.
Curriculum implementation which is the focus of this study is the translation of curriculum plan into practice (Offorma, 1994). After the curriculum has been planned and developed, the next line of action is normally done in the classroom (which by extension includes laboratories, libraries, workshops, studios, playfields) by the joint efforts of the teachers and the learners in the execution of an educational programme (Akpochafo and Filho,2006).

In the United States, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has maintained the baccalaureate system of nursing education for transforming the health system and how health care professionals are educated (AACN, 2008). The global community has embraced BNSc (Bachelor of Nursing Science) as the entry point to the profession. The entry point into the nursing profession in Australia ,Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Ireland, Finland, Italy, Spain, Norway, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, and Philippines is the BNSc (Etowa,2012).

University education in Nigeria, as it is the case in other developing countries has a specific mission of producing graduates grounded in the key generic skills, who on the basis of the high-quality higher education they offer would provide the needed catalyst for the nations socio-political and economic development. According to Akpochafo and Filho (2006), Nigerian universities at present are not producing high quality graduates.

 

GET FULL MATERIALS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *