PURCHASE FULL WORK -3500

ASSESSMENT OF SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ ACQUISITION OF SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS IN VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS IN ONDO STATE

Vocational Technical Education Project Topics & Materials

ASSESSMENT OF SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ ACQUISITION OF SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS IN VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS IN ONDO STATE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

                            

Title page                                                                                                    i

Approval page                                                                                           ii

Certification                                                                                                         iii

Dedication                                                                                                  iv

Acknowledgements                                                                                     v

Table of contents                                                                                        vi

List of tables                                                                                               ix

Abstract                                                                                                      x

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study                                                                            1

Statement of the Problem                                                                                     8

Purpose of the Study                                                                                  9

Significance of the Study                                                                                      10

Scope of the Study                                                                                               12

Research Questions                                                                                    12

Hypotheses                                                                                                 13

CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW 

Conceptual Framework                                                                                      14

Diagrammatic representation of the variables                                            15

Concept of Assessment                                                                              16

Science and Science Education                                                                             17

Chemistry                                                                                                   20

Science Process Skills                                                                                27Chemistry concept (volumetric analysis)                                                    22

Gender                                                                                                       37

Location                                                                                                     39

Theoretical Framework                                                                             41

Concepts Theory by Jean Piaget (1960)                                                     41

Hierarchical Theory of Learning by Robert Gagne (1965)                         42

Review of Empirical Studies                                                                               43

Studies on Science Process Skills                                                                       43

Studies on Chemistry concept (volumetric analysis)                                48

Studies on gender and location                                                                 50

Summary of Literature Review                                                                51     

CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHOD      

Design of the Study                                                                                    54

Area of the Study                                                                                       54

Population of the Study                                                                             55

Sample and Sampling Techniques                                                              55

Instrument for Data Collection                                                                            56

Validation of the Instrument                                                                      57

Reliability of the Instrument                                                                       57

Method of Data Collection                                                                         58

Method of Data Analysis                                                                                     59

CHAPTER FOUR: PRESENTATION OF RESULTS                                     60

Summary of the Major Findings                                                                66

Discussion of Results                                                                                 67

CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS, IMPLICATION, RECOMMENDATIONS, AND SUMMARY

Conclusions                                                                                                         72

Implications of the Findings                                                                       73

Recommendations                                                                                                74

Limitations of the Study                                                                                       75

Suggestions for further Study                                                                     75

Summary of the Study                                                                               76

REFERENCES                                                                                           78

APPENDICES                                                                                            89

Appendix A:    Corrected Instrument                                                                   89

Appendix B:    Reliability test                                                                    92

Appendix C:   Analysis of Data                                                                           96

Appendix D:   Population and sample distribution table                               106

Appendix E:   June WASSCE 2014 chemistry practical question              109

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Mean and standard deviation of students on the level of science process skills acquisition in volumetric analysis                                                60

Table2: Mean scores between male and female students’ acquisition of science process skills in volumetric analysis                                           62

Table 3: Mean scores between urban and rural students’ acquisition of science process skills in volumetric analysis                                                    63

Table 4: Independent t-test analysis of male and female students’ acquisition of science process skills in volumetric analysis                                     64

Table 5: Independent t-test analysis of urban and rural students’ acquisition of  science process skills in volumetric analysis                                65

ABSTRACT

This study ascertained the level of Senior Secondary School Students’ Acquisition of Science Process Skills in Volumetric analysis in Ondo state. Three research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study.  The study adopted a descriptive survey design. A sample of 240 made up of 130 male students and 110 female students were used for the study. The instrument used for data collection was a 20-item rating scale. The research questions were answered using mean and standard deviation while the null hypotheses were tested using t-test statistic. The findings of the study revealed that the level of senior secondary school students’ acquisition of science process skills in volumetric analysis is low. Also, it was revealed that senior secondary school male students demonstrated high level of science process skills acquisition in volumetric analysis than female students. Likewise, the senior secondary school students from urban location demonstrated high level of science process skills acquisition in volumetric analysis than students from rural location. The study further revealed there is significant difference between urban and rural senior secondary school students’ mean level of acquisition of science process skills in volumetric analysis, among others. Based on the findings, the researcher recommended that chemistry teachers should present the science process skills in clearer terms, starting from simple to complex in order for the students to acquire them.  Chemistry  teachers  should  direct  more  attention  to  female  students  to  make  them  improve  on  the science process skills acquisition to enhance their performance in chemistry. Laboratories especially those in the rural areas should be equipped and teachers should adopt methods that will help students acquire the appropriate skills and that chemistry concepts such as volumetric analysis should be practical oriented so that students will do science instead of learning about science, among others.

 

 

Background of the Study

Science consists of an organized body of knowledge, an attitudinal disposition, as well as a process and activity. According to Yanpar (2007) science deals with   practical application of ideas through manipulation of materials in such a manner leading to discoveries. The contributions of science to overall development of all nations cannot be over emphasized. This is the reason science holds an important position in the curriculum of Nigerian educational system (Federal Republic of Nigeria, (FRN), 2004). Therefore, the teaching and learning of science would require the acquisition of the science process skills.

Science process skills (SPS) are transferable skills that are applicable to many sciences and reflect the behaviours of scientists. According to Ozgelen (2012), science process skills are thinking skills that scientists use to construct knowledge in order to solve problems and formulate results. Sevilay (2011), posits that the mastery of science process skills enable students to conceptualize at a much deeper level, the content they do know and equips them for acquiring content knowledge in the future. The skills facilitate learning in physical sciences and ensure active participation of students in practical situations.

The science process skills form the foundation for scientific methods. According to Ibe (2004), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) came up with fifteen (15) science process skills. These include: observing, communicating, classifying, measuring, inferring, controlling variables, formulating models, questioning, designing experiment, hypothesizing, interpreting data, defining operationally, using number, using space/time relationship and predicting. However, this study will be concerned with five science process skills out of the fifteen proposed by AAAS. The reason for this choice is in line with Ajunwa (2000) who argued that science process skills, such as measuring, observing, experimenting, communicating and classifying are crucial for the development of a meaningful understanding of scientific concepts, propositions and for a meaningful use of scientific procedures for problem solving. Therefore, these skills seem to be very important individually as well as when they are integrated together.

GET FULL MATERIAL

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *