PURCHASE FULL WORK -3500

EFFECT OF ORIGAMI ON STUDENTS’ ACHIEVEMENT, INTEREST AND RETENTION IN GEOMETRY

Vocational Technical Education Project Topics & Materials

EFFECT OF ORIGAMI ON STUDENTS’ ACHIEVEMENT, INTEREST AND RETENTION IN GEOMETRY

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to explore the effects of Origami instructional approach on JS I students’ achievement, interest and retention in geometry. Six research questions and nine hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The study adopted a quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design and was restricted to Nsukka local Government Area of Enugu State. Two Co-educational Secondary Schools were drawn for the study using random sampling technique. Out of the two selected schools one was randomly assigned to Origami Group (OG) while the other one to the Control

Group (CG). A sample of 101 JS one students was involved (65 female and 36 male students). The instruments for data collection were geometry achievement test GAT) and geometry interest scale (GIS). Data collected were analyzed using mean, standard deviation and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). The result of the study revealed that use of Origami in teaching geometry to junior secondary school students enhanced their achievement, interest and retention in geometry. The study also revealed that the use of Origami had no statistically differential effect on male and female students’ achievement, interest and retention. Furthermore, there was no significant interaction between gender and instructional approach on students’ achievement and interest. On the other hand, the study revealed that, there was a significant interaction effect between gender and instructional material on retention of the concepts taught during the study. Based on the findings, the researcher recommended that use of Origami should be adopted in the teaching of geometry (mathematics) in primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of education system. It was also recommended that seminars, workshops and conferences should be mounted by professional bodies, federal and state ministries of education on the use of Origami for mathematics teachers, students and others. This will enable the mathematics educators, serving teachers, students and all to benefit from such an approach.

LIST OF TABLES

Tables                                                                                                                                 Page

 

1 Mean Achievement scores and standard Deviation of Experimental and control

groups in Pre-test and post-test (GAT)……………………………………………….. 93

 

2 The mean Achievement scores of Gender on experimental groups in PRETEST

and POSTTEST (GAT)..……………………………………………………………….94

 

3 Mean scores and standard Deviation of Experimental and control group in

Pre-test and Post-test (GIS)….………………………………………………………… 95

 

4 The mean scores of Gender (Sex) on Experimental groups in Pre-test and Post-test

(GIS).……………………………………………………………………………………96

 

5 Mean Retention scores of students in Experimental and control groups of (GRT)……97

 

6 Mean Retention scores of male and female students in the Experimental group of (GRT)……………………………………………………………………………..….. 98

 

7 Two-way Analysis of covariance of the control and Experimental group students

on geometry Achievement Test Due to Method, Gender and interaction. (For

hypotheses 1, 2 and 3)..………………………………………………………….…… 98

 

8 ANCOVA results of the control and experimental group students on geometry

interest scale due to gender; treatment and interaction. (for hypotheses 4, 5 and 6)…….100

 

9 Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) of the control and Experimental group

students on geometry Retention Test due to method, gender and Interaction (for

hypotheses 7, 8 and 9).………………………………………………………………102

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

Background of the Study

The broad aim of secondary education in Nigeria is to prepare the individual for useful living within the society and for higher education (Federal Ministry of Education  2004).The achievement of this objective requires sound background knowledge of the subject of mathematics, the subject that deals with the relationships among numbers, shapes, and quantities.

Among other physical science subjects, mathematics is the backbone in the National capacity building in science and technology (Ogbonna, 2007).  It equips the individual with the capacity to, among others, enumerate, calculate, measure, collate, group, analyze and relate quantities and ideas. In Arts and Humanities, mathematical concepts such as measurement, enlargement, symmetry, sequence, proportion, angle of elevation and depression, provide the baseline for the better understanding of some related universal concepts. It is therefore not a surprise that Mathematics is one of the compulsory core subjects which students must offer and pass at credit level, at the secondary level of education, as a pre-requisite for a useful living within the society and for higher education.

Despite the acknowledged importance of mathematics in national development, and the tremendous efforts being made by educationists and other stakeholders to improve the teaching and learning of the subject in secondary schools in Nigeria, students’ achievement in the subject still remains very low.  The statistics released by the National Examination Council (NECO) and West African Examination Council (WAEC) show that less than 40% of candidates who sat for mathematics in the past ten years (2000-2010), obtained a credit pass, at both the Junior- and Senior Secondary levels respectively. This trend negates the national drive for a sound social and technological development and needs therefore be halted.

The observed low performance of students in Mathematics has been traced to various factors, including weak foundation, especially in geometry, at the formative stage of the students’ education (Kurumeh, 2006), mathematics phobia and lack of interest (Amazigo, 2000), inadequate/ineffective course-delivery strategies adopted by teachers (Ogbonna, 2004; Nzewi, 2000), as well as poor reading/comprehension (poor retention) by students (Agwagah, 1993; Ogbonna, 2007). Many teachers still follow the traditional approach that relies heavily on textbooks, charts and diagrams (Agommuo, 2009).  In the words of Nzewi (2000), effective teaching is synonymous with effective learning/high achievement. Mathematics teachers therefore, have the professional responsibility to help, develop and maintain the interest of students in mathematics by exploring and employing modern concepts and instructional materials that will make their course deliveries more meaningful, effective, practical, productive and understandable.

Instructional resources, according to Offorma (1997) and Eya (2004), stimulate learners’ interest and help both the teacher and the learner to overcome physical limitation during presentation of the subject matters.  According to Usman and Obidua (2005), the use of appropriate instructional material in the classroom enhances motivation, improves comprehension, encourages effective participation, captures students’ interest and thus enhances learning. Both federal and state governments have since adopted these innovative research findings and recommended the use at primary and secondary school levels, of practical teaching method and instructional material.

GET FULL MATERIAL

Table of Contents

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *